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THE ARGUMENTS

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1 On July 3, 1947, Mac Brazel, riding on horseback with 7-year-old neighbor, Dee Proctor, on the Foster ranch near Corona, New Mexico, found a field of debris. Mac told Floyd Proctor, his closest neighbor, that the debris was "the strangest stuff he'd ever seen."*

2 A few days later, on July 6, Mac took some of the debris to Roswell, and showed it to Sheriff Wilcox, who contacted Roswell Army Air Field. The base security officer, Maj. Marcel, who, with Capt. Sheridan Cavitt accompanied Mac Brazel to the Foster ranch to inspect the debris field, stated that the debris "was nothing we had ever seen before," He said he was sure that it was not any kind of aircraft. "It was nothing made on this Earth," he said.*

3  According to the wife of Sheridan Cavitt, shortly after Maj. Marcel's return from Ft. Worth [see chronology], the two couples got together for their weekly bridge game. In the kitchen, the two men tried to boil a piece of the crash debris. Even the highest heat had no effect on the material.*

4  Retired Army Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) Master Sergeant Lewis S. "Bill" Rickett stated that, after the incident, he was assigned to assist Manhattan Project meteor scientist Dr. Lincoln La Paz of the University of New Mexico on a mission to determine the crashed UFO's speed and trajectory. Together, the two men traveled around the New Mexico desert looking for clues. They discovered a possible first-touchdown point about 5 miles northwest of the Foster ranch debris field. They found a small number of the strange pieces of debris there. Also, the sand there had crystallized, apparently as the effect of tremendous heat. Rickett said that the crashed object was not a balloon. He said that  he could never discern its purpose, but that "it wasn't ours!"*  4a Over a year after Rickett and La Paz had done their work, Rickett met, in Washington, D.C., with fellow counterintelligence agent Joe Wirth. Wirth said that the government's top researchers were still unable to identify the debris' metallurgical composition, and still were not able to cut it.*

5  On July 8, 1947, Mac Brazel told the Roswell Daily Record that the object that crashed on the ranch was not a weather balloon.*

6  The Army told Mac Brazel that they had established that "...it wasn't anything made by us."*

7 Retired Gen. Arthur E. Exon in 1947 was a member of the Air Material Command at Wright Field, where the Roswell materials were sent. He was at that time a lieutenant colonel, and an administration student in technology at the Foreign Technology Division there. By 1964, Exon had  become the Wright-Patterson AFB base commander. He knew people who had firsthand knowledge about the artifacts. Exon told investigators that after testing was done on these materials, the consensus among the scientists was that the materials had come from space.*

8  Exon further commented on the materials that arrived at Wright Field aboard the flight from Ft. Worth (this was the secret flight that was the supposedly cancelled continuation of the flight that took Maj. Marcel and debris from Roswell on July 8, 1947--see chronology). He said that the analysts who tested the material said that it was "very unusual." Exon said that the analysts were puzzled by these materials--they felt that what they were examining was something new. He said that, although some thought that the object might be Russian, the consensus was that the material had come "from space." Exon said that "Everyone from the White House down knew that what we had found was not of this world within 24 hours of our finding it."*

9  First Lt. Walter Haut, the Public Information Officer (PIO) for the 509th Bomb Group at the Roswell Army Air Field (RAAF), who, at around noon on July 8, 1947, had put out the press release that said that the military had recovered a flying disk, in 2002 prepared a sealed affidavit to be opened only after his death. Haut died in December, 2005. In the affidavit, Haut describes the materials that were handed around at a July 8th morning staff meeting. Haut states that these materials were like nothing he had ever seen. He says that nobody at the meeting could identify the materials.*

BEAMS

10 There were lightweight beams, about 3/8 or inch square. They looked somewhat like balsa wood, but they were not wood: they were very hard, but flexible, and could not be broken or burned.*

11 Upon returning to Roswell early on July 8 with samples of the strange debris, Maj. Marcel stopped by his home to show the material to his wife and 11-year-old son, before taking it to the base. A single rod was in the debris that Major Marcel laid out on his kitchen floor. It was 12" to 18" long. It had  undamaged ends, and was shaped like an "I-beam." This beam did not flex (but Jesse Marcel, Jr., who handled the beam, cannot recall having tried to bend it.). Marcel, Jr. (now Dr. Marcel) insists that the beam seemed more like metal than wood.*

12 Bill Brazel, Mac's son, examined this material and said of the beam's material: "Wood, I call it wood, I don't know what it was; it was something like balsa wood, but it wouldn't burn and I couldn't cut it with my knife."*

13  Loretta Proctor, Mac's neighbor, claimed that Mac showed her and her husband, Floyd, a beam. She said, "We cut on it with a knife and would hold a match on it and it wouldn't burn."*

14  Lt. Walter Haut, in his affidavit, stated that at the July 8th, 1947 staff meeting, where participants were shown debris that no one could identify, speaks of pieces that had unusual markings running along their length that were passed around.*

15  PFC Lloyd E. Nelson clerked for Lt. Haut in the RAAF base Public Information Office. Nelson says that at the time of the incident (he thinks it was Friday, July 11) Lt. Haut and Maj. Marcel came into the office and showed around the office small pieces of the debris. Nelson says that he was shown, and handled, one or two I-beams that were short and had reddish writing on them that he could not identify.*

 

SYMBOLS

 

16 Dr. Marcel saw a line of symbol-like markings on the inner surface of one side, running along the entire length of the beam, between the lips of the "I". The markings were purple or pink. "He was puzzled about how they were fixed to the beam, and concluded that they appeared to be printed or embossed."*

17 Lt. Walter Haut stated that he had seen these markings (see above),*  17a as did PFC Lloyd Nelson (see above).*

 

PARCHMENT-LIKE MATERIAL

18 There was a parchment-like substance, brown and extremely strong. It would not burn, or even smoke.*

18a Mac Brazel told neighbor Floyd Proctor that the parchment-like material could not be cut with a knife.*

 

BLACK PLASTIC MATERIAL (LIKE BAKELITE)

 

19 There was some "black plastic material which looked organic in nature."*

20"The 'bakelite' was thin like the 'metal foil' and very smooth. Dr. Marcel handled small pieces, all of them obviously broken from larger segments. . . . The pieces were all flat and he recalls no . . . deviation from flatness" There was much more of the foil than of the 'bakelite.' The"bakelite" was coal black.*

21 PFC Lloyd Nelson (see above) was shown by Lt. Haut and Maj. Marcel a piece of what might have been this 'bakelite' material: Nelson describes it as a very hard ceramic-type or flint-like material that seemed to be broken off of something--it was darker on one side than the other.*

 

METAL FOIL

 

General

22  Mac Brazel told Floyd Proctor that "the metal was different from anything he'd ever seen."*

23 There was no paper attached to either side of the foil that Dr. Marcel handled (he may not have handled all of the pieces that were in the kitchen), nor did he see paper or tape attached to the foil at all. The "foil" that he handled was flat and showed no signs of creasing or of abrasion.*

24 Dr. Marcel said that there were various sizes of the metallic debris, the largest being about 4" x 6". They were nearly weightless. They did not flex while being handled. (Dr. Marcel has no memory of having tried to flex them, though).*

25 Walt Whitmore, Jr., son of the owner of Roswell radio station KGFL said of this foil, "[It was] very much like lead foil in appearance but could not be torn or cut at all."*

26  Lt. Walter Haut, in his affidavit, described pieces of a material that looked like metal foil, but was very strong, that was passed around during the July 8th staff meeting.*

27  PFC Lloyd Nelson (see above) describes three pieces of metal that Haut and Marcel showed him: they were very thin, very hard, and aluminum-like. He said that Marcel told him that those who were testing the metal had found it to be very light and very hard, and unlike anything that they had ever seen before.

28 The "foil" was the color of "lead" foil. (The color of the foil in a pack of cigarettes c. 1947.)*

29 Gen. Exon (see above), apparently speaking of the metal, said that although some of it could be ripped easily, other pieces were very thin but very strong--even heavy hammers couldn't dent it. He said it was somewhat flexible. He said that some of the pieces were "flimsy and tougher than hell, and the [rest] was almost like foil but strong."*

 

 

Flexible Metal Foil

 

 

30 This material wouldn't tear. It could be wrinkled and it would resume its original shape. It could not be creased or bent. The army told Mac Brazel that they had definitely established that it was not made by us.*

31 Frankie Dwyer Rowe, a 12-year-old girl at the time of the incident, stopped by the fire station after a dental appointment to wait for her father, who was a crew chief in the Roswell Fire department. While she waited, a highway patrol officer, Robert Scroggins, came into the station to show the firemen a piece of the wreckage that he said he'd gotten from "someone" in the nearby town of Corona. Rowe, who was allowed to handle the object, described it as a small, silvery sheet that, if wadded up in the hand and dropped onto the surface of a table, would spread out like mercury into a thin irregular sheet in one or two seconds. She said it could not be cut with scissors, scratched or burned. It could not be permanently creased.*

32 Phyllis McGuire, daughter of sheriff Wilcox states that her father told her, "Some of it looks like tinfoil, but isn't. When you wad it up and then open your hand , it just comes right back out flat."*

33 Shirley Brazel described a material that would flow like water after it was wadded up in your hand.*

34  Rancher L. D. Sparks described a piece of thin, foil-like material that Dan Richards, the son of a local rancher, had him throw into the air while Dan fired a rifle at it. The shots just ricocheted off of the material. Sparks crumbled the material into a ball--when dropped, it would unfold as it floated through the air.*

35  Earl Fulford, who was in 1947 a staff sergeant in the 603rd Air Engineering Squadron at the Roswell base. He had a top secret clearance. Fulford said that he was taken to help clean up the debris field on the Foster ranch. Fulford said that, as part of the clean-up crew, he picked up small pieces of silvery, metal-like debris. He described the largest as being triangular, 3 to 4 inches wide by about 12 to 15 inches in length. He remembers that the piece flexed slightly when he picked it up, but he could wad it up in his hand. When he opened his hand it would, in a second or two, assume its original shape.*

36 Sgt. Homer G. Rowlette, Jr. was a member of the 603rd Air Engineering Squadron at the RAAF at the time of the incident. Rowlette told his son, Larry, and his daughter, Carlene, that the story of the crashed flying saucer was true. He told Larry that he'd participated in the clean-up. He described a thin foil that retained its shape.*

 

 

Inflexible Metal Foil

 

 

37  There were small pieces of metal like tinfoil, but they were not tinfoil. These pieces were as thin as the tinfoil in a pack of cigarettes, but, Marcel Sr. was told later by military personnel, could not be bent, and a sledgehammer would not put a dent in it. The material weighed almost nothing. It could not be cut or torn.*

38   "Jesse Marcel spoke to Walter Haut of a piece of the very strong lightweight metal being rested on a rock with the other end on the ground when the sledgehammer was applied with no dent."*

39  Retired Army Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) Master Sergeant Lewis S. "Bill" Rickett stated that he was taken to one of the crash sites by Captain Sheridan Cavitt (head of counterintelligence for the CIC). Rickett described pieces that were thin, light and strong. Rickett picked up a piece, one that was about 4 inches by 10 inches in size, very thin, extremely light in weight, and slightly curved. He put it over his knee to bend it, but he could not do it. Cavitt and Edwin Easley (the Roswell base provost marshal) laughed and said they couldn't bend it either. According to Rickett, Cavitt said to Easley, "Smart guy. Trying to do what we couldn't."*

40 PFC Lloyd E. Nelson, who clerked for Lt. Haut in the RAAF base Public Information Office and who says that he was shown pieces of the wreckage by Lt. Haut and Maj. Marcel, says that he was shown, and handled, three pieces of very thin, very hard, aluminum-like metal. He says that Marcel told him that those who were testing the metal had found it to be very light and very hard, and unlike anything that they had ever seen before.

 

 

BLACK BOX

41 "Cavitt, I think, found a black, metallic-looking box several inches square. As there was no apparent way to open this, and since it didn't appear to be an instrument package of any sort (it was very lightweight), we threw it in with the rest of the stuff. " (Jesse Marcel Sr.)*

42  As noted above, retired Army Counter Intelligence Corps (CIC) Master Sergeant Lewis S. "Bill" Rickett stated that, after the incident, he was assigned to assist Manhattan Project meteor scientist Dr. Lincoln La Paz of the University of New Mexico on a mission to determine the crashed UFO's speed and trajectory. Together, he said, as the two men traveled around the New Mexico desert looking for clues, they discovered a possible first-touchdown point about 5 miles northwest of the Foster ranch debris field, and there they found a small number of the strange materials. One of the artifacts that they recovered there was a seamless black box, a little larger than a shoebox, made of a material that resembled shiny plastic--it felt weightless. The box could not be opened, Rickett said.*

 

THREAD-LIKE MATERIAL

43  Bill Brazel, Mac's son, picked up some of the remaining pieces of debris in the months after the event. Among?these were pieces of a thread-like material a litter thicker than sewing thread. It could not be snapped by hand.*

44 In 1949, Army officers visited Bill Brazel, Macs son, and confiscated all of the pieces of the debris that he had collected and put into a cigar box.*

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Notes

1. B&M p. 83

2. C&S, p. 81

3. related by Mary Cavitt. C&S p. 78

4. C&S p. 192 

4a. related by Rickett. C&S p. 179

5. C&S p. 189

6. related by Bill Brazel, Mac's son. C&S p. 189

7. Exon interview--C&S pp. 190, 194

8. Exon interview. C&S p.194

9. Haut affidavit. C&S p. 210

10, J. Marcel, Sr.,  B&M p. 65

11. D2 p. 15

12. D3 p.7

13. F&B p. 72

14. C&S p. 210

15. C&S p. 240

16. quote: Durant. Multiple sources, including D2 p. 15

17. C&S p. 210

17a. C&S p. 240

18. J. Marcel, Sr., B&M pp. 65-66

18a  Floyd Proctor, B&M p. 83

19.  Dr. J. Marcel, B&M p. 70

20. D2 p. 17

21. C&S p. 240

22. B&M p. 83

23. D1 p.11

24. D1 p.10

25. F&B p. 73

26. C&S p. 210

28. D1 pp. 10-11

29. Exon interview. C&S p. 194

30. Bill Brazel, Macs son, B&M p. 79

31. C&S pp. 170-171

32. The UFO Magazine UFO Encyclopedia, William J. Birnes, ed., New York, Pocket Books, 2004, p. 83

33. related by Shirley Brazel. C&S p. 48

34. related by L. D. Sparks. C&S p. 52

35. related by Earl Fulford. C&S p. 106-7

36. related by Larry Rowlette. C&S 199

37. (J. Marcel, Sr., B&M pp. 65-67

38. Stanton Friedman, "Kent Jeffrey and Roswell," July 21, 1997

39. related by Rickett, C&S p. 184

40. related by Lloyd E. Nelson. C&S p. 240

41. B&M pp 65-66

42. related by Rickett. C&S p. 178

43. Bill Brazel, B&M p. 79

44. C&S p. 74

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©Richard Crist, 2007