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ROSWELL

 

PAGE 2

 

THE "MILITARY DOCUMENTS" ARGUMENTS

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I can imagine the skeptic attempting to counter my argument this way:

 

Skeptic. You say (87 (p. 1c.)) that the materials and bodies were exotic and otherworldly. But certain contemporary military documents show that what you say cannot be true: 90  [vs. 87] For instance, there is The Twining Letter to Schulgen, Sept. 23, 1947: 91 In a letter dated Sept. 23, 1947 (less than 3 months after the Roswell incident) signed by Lt. General Nathan Twining, Commander, Air Materiel Command (AMC) at Wright Field, to Brigadier General George Schulgen, chief of the Air Intelligence Requirement Division at the Pentagon, Twining says, "Due consideration must be given [to] the lack of physical evidence in the shape of crash-recovered exhibits which would undeniably prove the existence of these objects." (Actually, the letter was written for General Twining by Col. Howard McCoy, Director of the Intelligence Division (T-2) of AMC.) 92 If Twining had known of any alien materials recovered at Roswell, he would not have implied, in a letter such as this to the Pentagon, that no such evidence existed. [ 132] 93 But he did imply this. 94 So, Twining did not know about any such materials.*  95 But if any such materials had been recovered, Twining, as commander of AMC at Wright Field, would have known about it. 96 Therefore, contrary to your statement (87) that the materials were exotic, there was in fact no recovery of exotic materials at Roswell.*

 

 97 [vs. 92] To this argument I would respond that it's important to look at the historical context of the Twining letter: 98 In the summer of 1947, Lt. Col. George Garrett, in the Pentagons Air Force Office of Intelligence Requirements--Collections (AFOIR-CO), was given the task of collecting UFO information. In about September, 1947, the Pentagon started transferring its UFO files to Alfred C. Loedding at Wright-Patterson Air Force Bases Intelligence Division (T-2).

99 In early July, Col. Garrett and the FBI had been put on high alert for information about the flying disks, but after only two weeks, the pressure suddenly and completely disappeared. 100 "This odd occurrence, which has been nicknamed 'the Silence from Topside,' led Garrett and his FBI liaison, S. W. Reynolds, to conclude that not only 'the high brass appeared to be totally unconcerned,' but that 'there were objects seen which somebody in the government knows all about.'"*

101  Garret prepared an "estimate of the situation," that would put forth a best guess intelligence analysis of the flying disk phenomenon. Still totally puzzled by the Silence from Topside, Garrett sent this estimate to Lt. General Nathan Twining, at Wright-Patterson, to get a response from Twining's technical experts. 102 This communication was essentially a query about whether or not Garrett and Reynolds should continue assiduously to collect UFO reports. 103 Twining, upon receipt of the estimate, had McCoy draft a response to Garrett. The September 23, 1947 letter to Brig. General George Schulgen (Col. Garrett's superior at the Pentagon), signed by Twining, was this response. 104 Thus, the letter was written in order to inform Colonel Garrett, and through him the FBI, that Wright-Patterson believed that the disks are real, not built by us, and that Garrett and the FBI should continue their UFO work. It served also to suggest to Gen. Schulgen that a formal project be set up at Wright-Patterson to collect and analyze UFO reports (which was done--this is the genesis of Project Sign).

105 If Garrett and Reynolds had had no need to know about the Roswell debris, then McCoy, even if he had known about the recovery of exotic debris near Roswell, would not have mentioned in it the Roswell materials, and Gen. Twining, even if he had known about such debris, would have approved the misleading letter. And? the letter could be, and was, marked 'Secret.' 106 There was, in fact, no need for Garrett or Reynolds to know about any crashed UFO to do their jobs. 107 So, it is distinctly possible that both Twining and McCoy knew about the Roswell materials, yet would nevertheless have sent a letter to Gen. Schulgen that implied that no such evidence existed.* [ 108]

 

I can then imagine the skeptic's response:

 

Skeptic. 108 [vs. 107] Twining and McCoy might have omitted mention of the Roswell materials, but the statement "Due consideration must be given [to] the lack of physical evidence in the shape of crash-recovered exhibits" clearly implies that no such exhibits exist. This is tantamount to a lie, and the government does not lie to protect secrets. [ 109]

 

[108 is not proven:] The skeptic  says (at 108) that the government would not lie to protect secrets. But 109 a cover story was issued claiming that the Trinity Site nuclear explosion in July of 1945 was an ammunition dump exploding. And, 110 in fact, the Air Force admitted that the July 9, 1947 weather balloon story was a lie -- to cover up, they said, the Mogul story. 111 All this shows that the government will, in fact, lie to protect important secrets.*

 

Another, similar argument by the skeptic:

 

Skeptic. 112 Let's look at a second document: in the minutes of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board conference of March 17 and 18, 1948, Colonel Howard McCoy, Chief of Intelligence ("T-2") for Air Materiel Command, at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, speaks about intelligence operations at Air Materiel Commands T-2, and says:

"We have a new project--Project Sign--which may surprise you as a development from the so-called mass hysteria of the past summer when we had all the unidentified flying objects or discs. This cannot be laughed off. We have over 300 reports which have not been publicized in the papers from very competent personnel, in many instances--men as capable as Dr. K. D. Wood and practically all Air Force, Airline people with broad experience. We are running down every report. I can't even tell you how much we would give to have one of those crash in an area so that we could recover whatever they are." *

113 If the words of this quote, attributed to McCoy, clearly convey ignorance of any recovered exotic materials, then we can say with confidence that McCoy did not, in fact, know of any such materials. [ 124, 129, 133] 114  These words do, in fact, (through implication) convey ignorance of such exotic materials. 115  So, McCoy did not know of any such materials.*  But 116 Wright-Patterson was where any recovered wreckage from a foreign craft of any kind would be taken and subjected to technical analysis. 117 So, if alien materials had been recovered from a crashed saucer in 1947, then they would have been taken there.

Now, 118 if any such alien debris had been taken to Wright-Patterson, then Colonel McCoy, as Chief of Intelligence of AMC would have known about it. [ 121, 142] All this means that 119 if alien materials had been recovered, then McCoy would've known about itBut, since he didn't know about it (see 115), we can be sure that 120 no alien materials had been recovered in New Mexico in 1947.*

 

121 [118 is not proven:] The skeptic says (at 118) that if any such alien debris had been taken to Wright-Patterson, then Colonel Howard McCoy, as Chief of Intelligence of AMC would have know about it. But if exotic materials had been found near Roswell in 1947, it is possible that, since the matter may well have been deemed a laboratory and technology issue, it would have been sent to T-3, the Engineering and Technology Division at Wright-Patterson, and not to T-2 and Colonel McCoy. 122 If the materials were sent to T-3, then Colonel McCoy, of T-2, might not have been told about it. [ 137, 138, 141]  123 Therefore, even if exotic materials had been found near Roswell, Colonel McCoy might not have known about it.

[113 is false:] Again, the skeptic says(at 113) that If the words of this quote, attributed to McCoy, clearly convey ignorance of any recovered exotic materials, then we can say with confidence that McCoy did not, in fact, know of any such materials. But 124 recall that Colonel McCoy was Chief of Intelligence for Air Materiel Command at Wright-Patterson AFB. Colonel McCoy's goal, in speaking to this group of about 39 men of the Scientific Advisory Board, was to convince the Board that ten scientists should be added to the AMC staff and that a new Applied Research Section should be established within the AMC. 125 To further this goal, McCoy was trying to impress the Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) by describing what the AMC was accomplishing at Wright-Patterson. (The SAB chairman Theodore von Karman, later, did in fact write to the USAF Director of Research and Development recommending that the 10 new positions be created, and the new section established at the AMC.) 126 Therefore, it was not a situation where the members of the board had been determined to have a need to know in any comprehensive way about what AMC knew about flying saucers.

127  Now, if the members of the Board had no need to know in a comprehensive way about flying saucers, and so no need to know about any recovered materials, then McCoy, even if he knew about such materials, would not have made mention of them. 128  So, even if he'd known about a Roswell saucer crash,  he would not have made mention of it to the board, and so, his statement does not show that he didn't know about such a crash.* [ 139]

[vs. 113:] The skeptic says(113) that if the words of this quote, attributed to McCoy, clearly convey ignorance of any recovered exotic materials, then we can say with confidence that McCoy did not, in fact, know of any such materials. But the following argument shows that this is not necessarily true at all. 129 It seems true to say that if the SAB had had members who lacked top secret clearances, and if the subject of any recovery of exotic materials had been classified top secret, then McCoy, even if he'd known about such materials, wouldn't have mentioned it at the SAB meeting. 130In fact, apparently, the SAB indeed did have members who lacked top secret clearances at that time. And, surely, 131 the subject of the recovery of any exotic materials would have been classified top secret (at least). 132  So, McCoy, even if he'd known about such materials, wouldn't have mentioned it at the meeting. In such a case, the quote would have conveyed ignorance, yet McCoy would have known about the materials.*

[vs. 113:] Again, the skeptic says(113) that if the words of this quote, attributed to McCoy, clearly convey ignorance of any recovered exotic materials, then we can say with confidence that McCoy did not, in fact, know of any such materials. But here's another possibility that shows that this is not necessarily true: 133 This document was, apparently, originally marked secret, yet 134 information about a crash at Roswell would surely have been classified, at least, top secret. 135 It is possible that McCoy had spoken about the Roswell crash at the conference, and that everyone in the room understood that this material would be omitted from the minutes. The recorded statement quoted by Skeptic, then, would have been a "throw-out," designed to substitute, in the merely secret document, for the more highly classified words actually uttered. 136 Therefore, again, it is not necessarily true that McCoy's quote as represented in the document shows that he did not know about a Roswell crash.*

 

Skeptic. [122 is false] You say (122) that if the materials were sent to T-3, then Colonel McCoy might not have been told about it. But 137 surely, McCoy would have been let in on the secret--he would have been viewed, by those in the know, as a patriot, a soldier, and a good old boy. I still maintain that if there was exotic debris, then McCoy would've known about it. [ 141]

[122 is false] Again, you say (122) that if the materials were sent to T-3, then Colonel McCoy might not have been told about it. But 138 an Oct. 11, 1948 memorandum from Col. Brooke Allen confirms that if the Engineering Department had a saucer, the Intelligence Department would not only be aware of it, they would also be ?integrally involved--this is just common sense.

[vs. 128] You say (128) that even if he'd known about a Roswell saucer crash, he would not have made mention of it to the board. 139 This may be true, but he didn't, in his statement, merely omit mention of any exotic debris; rather, he strongly implied that there were no such materials. This amounts to a lie, and 140 the government, though it might not disclose sensitive facts, would not actually lie--thus McCoy would not have lied. [ 141]

 

[137 does not show that 122 is false:] The skeptic says here(137) that McCoy surely would have been let in on the secret. 141 Maybe they would have let McCoy in on it, but maybe not. All I have to do is show that they might not have, and that its distinctly possible that McCoy didn't know about the exotic materials.

[140 is not proven:] The skeptic says that the government would not lie to protect secrets. But, 142 as I noted above, a cover story was issued claiming that the Trinity Site nuclear explosion in July of 1945 was an ammunition dump exploding. And, 143 in fact, the Air Force admitted that the July 9, 1947 weather balloon story was a lie -- to cover up, they said, the Mogul story. 144 All this shows that the government will, in fact, lie to protect important secrets.*

 

Skeptic. Lets look at a third document: a letter sent by McCoy to Cabell, dated Nov. 8, 1948: You say (87) that the materials were exotic, but the following argument refutes that claim:

145 If McCoy had known about such a crash, he would not imply in a letter to Maj. General C. P. Cabell, Director of Intelligence for the AF at the Pentagon, that there was no such crash. 146 Yet he did just that: in a letter sent by McCoy to Cabell, dated Nov. 8, 1948, McCoy says that there was "no conclusive proof" that the flying disks were real aircraft, and that no physical evidence "such as that which would result from a crash" was on hand. [ 152] 147 Therefore, McCoy didn't know that there was a saucer crash at Roswell.*  148 Furthermore, if exotic materials had been recovered at Roswell, then Col. Howard McCoy, Wright-Patterson Director of T-2 (Intelligence Division), would have known about it. [ 150] 149 Therefore, again contrary to your statement (5) that the materials were exotic, no exotic materials had in fact been recovered at Roswell.*

 

150 [vs. 148:] I've already argued (123 )against the skeptic's point (118) that McCoy would've known--but let me make another point:

151 First, a word about Project Sign: As I noted above, about September, 1947, the Pentagon began transferring its saucer documents to civilian intelligence engineer, Alfred C. Loedding. In February, 1948, a group made up of Loedding and a few of his colleagues was formally titled "Project Sign." This is the top-down command hierarchy at Wright Field in 1948, leading down to Project Sign:

Air Materiel Command (AMC), under Lt. General Twining

Intelligence Division, called T-2, under Col. McCoy (the Engineering and Technology Division was T-3).

Intelligence Analysis Division, under Col. William Clingerman.

Analysis Section (MCIAT)

Special Projects branch, under Maj. Raymond A. Llewellyn

Project Sign

Project Sign was headed by Capt. Robert R. Sneider. The other members of Project Sign were:

Lt. Howard W. Smith

George W. Towles

Maj. Llewellyn (who did drop-in work)

John (Red) Honaker (joined later, from Clingermans office)

Albert B. Deyarmond (civilian engineer)

Alfred Loedding (on loan from T-3)

Lawrence Truettner (civilian engineer)

152 [vs. 146:] McCoy did not write this letter, although as head of T-2, he signed off on it. "An MCIAT designator on the letter of November 8, 1948 tells us that someone in the Analysis section office wrote it, in this particular instance Albert B. Deyarmond (A.B.D.)," a member of the Project Sign team. "Deyarmond wrote this letter at the behest of the Project Sign team. This letter, therefore, was the product of the knowledge and interests of Sneider, Loedding, Truettner, and Deyarmondand was, at the least, unobjected to by Clingerman and McCoy." It was not, then, McCoy who implied in the letter that there was no such crash. So your argument is unsound.

 

In response to this, the skeptic might say:

 

Skeptic. Granted, for arguments sake, that McCoy didn't write this letter, and that it was written by the Project Sign team. In this case, the following argues against your point (87) that the debris and bodies was exotic: 153 [vs. 87 (p. 1c.)] If The Project Sign team had known about a saucer crash, they wouldn't have sent a letter to Cabell implying that there was no such crash. 154 But, as you say, they did write such a letter (the Nov. 8, 1948 letter signed by McCoy). 155 So, its clear that they didn't know about a crash.*  156 Furthermore, if there'd been a saucer crash, then the Project Sign team, a group assigned the task of investigating the disks, would've known about it. [ 158 ] Since they didn't know about it (see 155), 157 there was no such crash.*

 

[vs. 156:] Here(156), the skeptic claims that if there'd been a saucer crash, if exotic materials had been retrieved, then the Project Sign team would have known about it. But the following argument shows that there's really no reason to believe that they would have known:

158 If exotic materials had been recovered on the Foster ranch, then those in the know would no longer need to determine the nature of the disk ?henomenon. But they surely would have recalled the stir caused by the Silence from Topside; i.e., by their sudden apparent lack of interest in the UFO reports, and so may well have set up Project Sign for the sole purpose of giving the impression that they were still interested. That is, if exotic material had been recovered, then Project Sign may well have been a sham. 159 And if Project Sign was a sham, then the team would've had no need to know about any recovered exotic materials, and so would not have known about such materials. 160 Therefore, if there'd been an exotic crash, then the Project Sign team might well not have known about it.

 

Skeptic. 161 [vs. ?] Also, as I said (122), if there'd been a saucer crash, then McCoy would've known about it. [ 166] 162 And if McCoy had known about it, he wouldn't have signed off on a letter to Cabell that implied there was no crash. [ 166] 163 But, as you admit, he did. 164 Therefore, McCoy didn't know about any such crash.*   165 And so, there was no saucer crash.*

 

166 [vs. 161:] But with respect to the skeptic's second point, that McCoy would've known about any exotic materials having been recovered: as I showed above (123), its quite possible that McCoy did not know about the Roswell materials.

167 [vs. 162:] Also, the skeptic says (162) that if McCoy had known about the alien materials, then McCoy would not have signed off on a letter to Cabell that implied that there were no retrieved materials. But this is not necessarily true. If, for instance, McCoy understood that Sign was designed to give the impression that the government was still in the dark as to the nature of the disks and wished to perpetuate that impression then, although he knew the disks were alien, he may have signed off on that letter.

 

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Notes

 

94. 92, 93 MT

96. 94, 95  MT.  from an argument by Kent Jeffrey: J p.6

100.  cited by Micael D. Swords, "A Different View of  'Roswell--Anatomy of a Myth,'" Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol. 12, No. 1, 1998, p. 105:  FBI. (1947). FOIAd documents package from the Federal Bureau of Investigation.Fund for UFO Research. Volume 12, FUFOR: Mt. Rainier MD. 

107. 105, 106 MP

?

111. Robert M. Wood. Critique of Roswell--Anatomy of a Myth, Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol. 12, No 1, p. 131

112. Emphasis added.  USAF-SAB 1948

115. 113, 114 MP

119. 117, 118 HS

120. 115, 119 MT.   from an argument by Kent Jeffrey: J p. 6

128. 126, 127 MP    adapted from Michael D. Swords, A Different View of Roswell--Anatomy of a Myth. Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol.12, No. 1, pp109-110

132. Swords, p. 110

136. from an argument described by, but not subscribed to by, Swords, p. 110

138. Kent Jeffrey

144. Robert M. Wood. Critique of Roswell--Anatomy of a Myth, Journal of Scientific Exploration, Vol. 12, No 1, p. 131

147. 145, 146 MT

149. 148, 147 MT.  from an argument by Kent Jeffrey: J p.6

152. Swords, p. 112

155. 153, 154 MT

157. 156, 155 MT

160. 158, 159 HS

164. 162, 163 MT

165. 161, 164 MT

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© Richard Crist, 2007