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ROSWELL

 

PAGE 8

 

THE "IT WAS A MOGUL BALLOON" ARGUMENT

________________________________________________________________________

 

The following represents a frequently encountered argument against the notion that the Roswell debris was exotic:

 

Skeptic. 271 [vs. 87 (p. 1c.)] Project Mogul was a secret project, managed by New York University and Watson Labs, that launched balloons from Alamogordo Army Air Field and White Sands in New Mexico, during June and July of 1947. 272 The purpose of these flights was to determine if Soviet nuclear tests could be detected by monitoring low-frequency sound waves in the upper atmosphere. 273 The project team launched a number of monitoring flights during this period. 274 The balloons through Flight 7 (July 2, 1947) consisted of clusters of 24 or more neoprene (rubber) meteorological balloons. Later flights used single balloons made of polyethylene.*  275 These Mogul balloons and balloon clusters carried sonobuoy microphones to pick up the sound of soviet nuclear tests.

276 The Mogul balloon flights were tracked in several different ways: 277 At least some of the flights carried ML-307 radar targets so that they could be tracked by radar. These multi-faced targets (some of which were manufactured by a toy or novelty company) consisted of sheets of aluminum foil, with paper backing, supported by balsa-wood beams. According to Professor Charles Moore, the on-scene Project Engineer, these beams were coated with an Elmers-type glue for strength.*  278 The targets were reinforced by acetate and/or cloth tape. Moore said that some of them were assembled with tape covered with purple/pink floral patterns. 279 At least some of the flights were tracked using radio triangulation, and so at least some of them carried radiosondes. 280  A radiosonde is a piece of equipment that is generally used in weather balloon flights to measure pressure, altitude, temperature, etc. and to transmit the data to a receiver on the ground. 281 The flights were also tracked visually from the ground using theodolites, or from the air, using chase aircraft. 282 In the case of scrubbed missions, Moore says, the balloons were sent up anyway, stripped of equipment.

283 Dr. Albert Crary, on-site Director of Operations, kept a diary of the project. On June 3, 1947 his entry speaks of a balloon flight that was "abandoned due to cloudy skies." The next day he wrote:

284 "June 4 Wed. Out Tularosa Range and fired charges between 00 and 06 this a.m. No balloon flights again on account of clouds. Flew regular sonobuoy up in cluster of balloons and had good luck on receiver on ground but poor on plane. Out with Thompson p.m. Shot charges from 1800 to 2400." (HQ USAF, Attachment 32/Appendix 17)

285 This balloon flight of June 4, 1947 was never recovered. 286 No further record exists of what it carried, and no record at all exists of its flight path. 287 It seems true to say that if, independently of consideration of the Roswell debris, we deem that it's at least possible that the June 4 balloon carried a radar target (which would have been an ML-397 target as described above), and if it's at least possible, again independent of the resemblance of the Roswell debris to a radar target, that its flight path took it over the Foster ranch, and if the debris is reconcilable with the ML-307 radar reflector and other parts of the Mogul train, then the June 4 balloon must have carried ML-307 targets and must have landed on the Foster Ranch, and must have been the source of the debris.

First, we have to show that it's possible that the June 4 balloon carried a radar target: 288 In fact, Flight 2 carried radar reflectors for tracking, but flight 5 used a radiosonde. The June 4 balloon was launched before Flight 5 (if it was a Mogul flight , the June 4 balloon would have been Flight #4).

289 Now, consider this scenario: The June 4th flight carried reflectors, and the disappearance and loss of that flight was the impetus for the team to switch from reflectors to radiosondes on Flight #5 and later flights. Such a scenario would give us an explanation (which we would otherwise lack) for the switch from reflectors to radiosondes. 290 If a possible scenario gives an explanation for something, one that we would otherwise lack, then we should give that scenario credence. 291 Therefore, we should give this scenario credence, and thus allow that the June 4th flight might well have been carrying radar reflectors.*  292 So, we seem correct in saying that its (not just possible, but) likely that the June 4th flight did, indeed, carry ML-307 radar reflectors for tracking. [ 321,  322]

Second, we have to establish that the July 4 balloons flight path took it over the Foster ranch: 293 Charles Moore, after jogging his memory by looking at Crary's diary, came to believe that he remembered tracking the June 4th flight. Moor said,

 

"We tracked Flight #4 [Moore believes the June 4th flight to be Mogul Flight #4] to the Capitan Peak, Arbela, Bluewater New Mexico area before we lost contact with it, 17 miles from the Foster ranch. I vividly remember we tracked it from the ground and air with the various exotic New Mexico town names being called out. It was the first and last time I or any Mogul flight ever had any association with these N.M. locales."

294 We can assume what he's saying is true. [ 323, 326] 295 Moore also, using available weather data, reconstructed the flight path of the June 4th flight, and found that this balloon could have been taken over the Foster ranch. [ 328] 296 Therefore, it's not just possible, but probable that the flight trajectory of the June 4th balloon took it over the Foster ranch.

297 Third, we have to show that the debris is reconcilable with the ML-307 radar reflector and other parts of the Mogul train: 298 Jesse Marcel, Jr. described the small beam that he handled in his kitchen when his father brought the Foster-ranch debris home to show his family this way: it was an I-beam, light-weight like balsa wood but seemingly metallic, about the same color as that of the foil-like material--and it had a set of pink/purple "symbols" running down its length--and there was no tape attached to it. He said that it was not wood. But, 299 According to Charles Moore, the balsa wood beams that made up the support structure of the ML-307 radar reflector were coated with Elmers-type glue for strength--this coating could have made them seem more metallic than wooden. 300 Also, Jesse Jr. may have been mistaken about the beams shape. His father said that the small members had a rectangular cross-section. Or, the stick that Jesse Jr. handled may simply have had flared edges for some reason. 301 Irving Newton told Jeffrey that he saw markings on the balsa sticks in General Ramey's office--he claimed that the marks were the result of the dye from (no longer attached) tape having bled through to the stick. Such marks would be consistent with those described by Jesse Jr. And it would explain why they did not appear flower-like. [ 329, 330, 333] 302 A drawing was made of the symbol-like marks according to Jesse Marcel, Jrs description while he was under hypnosis. The same artist drew the marks as remembered by Irving Newton. The drawings are similar.

303 These arguments (298-302) show that the beam that Marcel Jr. handled may have been simply the strut from an ML-307 radar reflector. (I.e., the description of Jesses beam is reconcilable with a beam from an ML-307 radar reflector.) [ 336, 337, 338, 339]

304 The Bakelite-like material could represent the remains of the plastic cases that carried kerosene* or sand for ballast, or of the covering of an instrument package. [ 340] 305 Therefore, the Bakelite-like material is reconcilable with part of a Mogul balloon train.

306 The foil matches the foil of a reflector, and the parchment matches the foils paper backing. [ 340] 307 Therefore, the foil and parchment is reconcilable with such a reflector.

308 The string-like material described by Bill Brazel matches the nylon twine of the Mogul train. 309 Therefore, the string-like material is reconcilable with the Mogul train.

310 The photos of the debris in Rameys office show clearly the remains of an ML-307 radar reflector, [ 359, 360, 362] and 311 Mac Brazel himself, in the July 9, 1947 Roswell Daily Record, is quoted as saying that the debris was made up of sticks, foil, and tape with flower patterns on it. [ 367]

312 "Indestructible" can mean merely "tough": 313 If the material was actually so indestructible, it would not break up into pieces. 314 But it broke up. 315  So, it was not actually so indestructible.

316 The sledgehammer story was second hand: Marcel indicated that one of the airmen tried to, but couldn't, dent the foil[?], and told Marcel about it.

317 Cavitt now says he immediately recognized the debris as the remains of a balloon ... covering an area 20 feet square.*  317a Cavitt, relieved of any secrecy restrictions, said it was a single weather balloon and radar reflector and signed an affidavit to that effect. * [ 368]

318 These arguments (298-317) show that the debris was reconcilable with a Mogul balloon train. [ 369] 319 Therefore the balloon that Crary described as having been launched on June 4, 1947 must have carried radar reflectors and must have landed on the Foster ranch, and was the source of the debris in question.* [ 363]   320 Therefore, the debris was not exotic, but mundane.

 

 321  [vs. 292] In this argument, the skeptic  says (see 292)  that it's (not just possible, but) likely that the June 4th flight did, indeed, carry ML-307 radar reflectors for tracking. But there is no real tangible evidence at all that the June 4th flight carried radar reflectors.

322 [vs. 292] In fact, the lack of radar tracking records suggests that none of the launches had radar targets. [ 370]

323 [vs. 294] Also, the skeptic saysthat "we can assume what he's saying is true," but it should be noted that Charles Moore claimed to be on hand for the launch, on January 4, 1948, of the Skyhook that Captain Mantell chased [explain] before crashing, but records have shown that he did not show up for a skyhook launch until the end of the month. Moore acknowledged that his memory was wrong.*   324 He also said that his memories of the specifics of Mogul flights were generally vague. 325 Therefore, we should not accept Moore's statements at face value.

326 [vs. 294] Also, three months later, Flight #17 flew over these same "exotic" locales. Yet Moore said that only one flight flew over these. 327  Therefore, Moore may well have been thinking of Flight #17, not the June 4th flight.*

328 [vs. 295] The skeptic claims (see 200a) that "Moore , using available weather data, reconstructed the flight path of the June 4th flight, and found that this balloon could have been taken over the Foster ranch". But David Rudiak recalculated the flight path and found that the balloon probably did not go over the ranch.

329 [vs. 301] The skeptic  states (see 301)  that "Irving Newton told Jeffrey that he saw markings on the balsa sticks in General Rameys office--he claimed that the marks were the result of the dye from tape having bled through to the stick." But, in fact, dye would not have adhered to coated sticks.*

330 [vs. 301] And, if the dye is so unstable that it could bleed through, it would simply have bled off of the tape before soaking into it.*     331 And, such ink would have simply come off of the stick before it would have bled into it.*  332 And, by all accounts the tape used was a cellophane adhesive tape, which is impermeable, so printed designs on the outer surface could not have bled through to the other side and through the adhesive to leave a distinct mark on the wood.*

333 [vs. 301] Also, Newton had been interviewed by William Moore for the book The Roswell Incident (1979), and ten years later by Kevin Randle. In neither interview did Newton mention having seen the floral tape. 334 Also Newton said he met Marcel--but his story changed. This bolsters the view that Newton's more recent account in general lacks credibility. Also, in correspondence with Robert Todd and C. B. Moore, Newton claimed to have met Major Marcel in General Ramey's office and that Marcel had insisted that the balloon and radar targets on the floor were parts of an alien spacecraft and that the markings on the stick were alien hieroglyphics--but when interviewed by William Moore for his 1979 book, Newton said, referring to Maj. Marcel: "I was later told that a major from Roswell had identified the stuff." 335  Therefore, Newton's present story cannot be trusted... is suspect

336 [vs. 303-- i.e., vs. the logic: 298+301+302, therefore 303. Can't make the induction because premises are omitted] The skeptic claims (see 290)  that his arguments show that "the beam that Marcel Jr. handled may have been simply the strut from an ML-307 radar reflector." But recall that William Brazel, Mac's son, said of this "balsa": "...some wooden like particles... like balsa wood in weight, but a bit darker in color and much harder... It was pliable but wouldn't break...weighed nothing, but you couldn't scratch it with your fingernail."*   336a And he's quoted as saying, "wood, I call it wood, I don't know what it was; it was something like balsa wood, but it wouldn't burn, and I couldn't cut it with my knife."*

337 [vs. 303] And, if Mac Brazel had bothered to take a piece of balsa wood to show the Proctors (and then take a lot of pieces of material to Roswell), he would've been a complete dope--and no one, including, e.g., the Proctors, claim that he was a dope; rather, everyone thought that the debris was truly weird.

338 [vs. 303] Dr. Jesse Marcel (Jesse Marcel Jr.)., who had been a hobbyist as a boy--he had built model airplanes from balsa wood, and so very familiar with balsa wood--is adamant that the "balsa" stick was in fact not balsa wood.

339 [vs. 303] Loretta Proctor, Mac Brazel's neighbor said of this material, "We cut on it with a knife and would hold a match on it, and it wouldn't burn. We knew it wasn't wood. I hadn't seen anything like it."*

340 [vs. 304] The skeptic claims that the Bakelite-like material could represent the remains of the plastic cases that carried kerosene [Durant citing C. Moore] or sand for ballast, or of the covering of an instrument package. But Dr. Marcel (one of those who described the "plastic"), who had worked with bakelite, did not identify the material as bakelite.*   341 Also, the pieces of "bakelite" that Marcel Jr. saw in his kitchen were flat, but the plastic containers of kerosene ballast allegedly carried by the June 4th Mogul flight would have been egg-shaped, with no flat surfaces, and were made of clear plexiglass, not opaque black. 342 Therefore, the "bakelite" from the debris could not have been from the Mogul ballast containers.*   343 Nor could the "bakelite" have been plastic from an instrument package, because, first, 344 the instrument package was in the upper part of the Mogul array, and the skeptics view is that the debris was from the lower section.*   Second,

345 the instrument package consisted of a sonobuoy microphone and a transmitter. The transmitter was housed in a box only three by five inches which was most likely made of sheet metal, to minimize weight.*  Third, 346 if the "bakelite" that Dr. Marcel described had been from a bakelite instrument cabinet, then it would have had some straight sides and signs of workmanship (such as drilled holes). But the sides of the "bakelite" Marcel saw were jagged, and there was no sign of workmanship. 347 Recall that Msgt. Lewis Rickett said, apparently referring to the "bakelite," that although the piece was extremely thin, it couldn't be bent or broken, and that he couldn't figure out what it was. [ 371]

348 [vs. 306] The skeptic states(see 306)  that "the foil matches the foil of a reflector, and the parchment matches the foil's paper backing." But according to Dr. Marcel (under hypnosis), there was no paper attached to either side of the foil-like material, or attached to the "?oil" in any way. 349 Therefore, in this respect, there is no match between the debris and what Dr. Marcel examined in his kitchen. 350 Also according to Dr. Marcel, no tape was attached to the foil. 351 Therefore, again, there is no match. 352 And, if the foil of a reflector had been torn apart into many small pieces by winds on the rough terrain of the Foster ranch, and then stuffed into a cardboard box and then dumped on the Marcel's kitchen floor, then it all would have been crumpled, would have creases, scratches and abrasions. 353 But according to Dr. Marcel, each piece of foil that he examined was flat, and the materials exhibited no creases, scratches or abrasions [citation] . 354 Recall also how Frankie Rowe described it (she was apparently referring to the foil) as smooth as glass. Phyllis McGuire also said it was smooth. 355  Dr. John Kromschroeder, friend of Poppy Henderson [more on Henderson] , described the metal he saw as being different than alloys we have in our aircraft. 356 Also, recall (see p.1a, 30-36) how Phyllis McGuire, Frankie Rowe, Bill Brazel and others described how this material would uncrumple and flatten out on its own. Bill Brazel said that he couldn't tear it. 357 Major Marcel described (an inflexible version of?) the foil as being thin as tinfoil but could not be bent or dented. (He apparently meant that the foil would not remain creased.) 358 Therefore, it is simply false to say that the "foil" of the debris matched the foil of a reflector.

359 [vs. 310] The skeptic says (see 310) that the photos of the debris in Ramey's office show clearly the remains of an ML-307 radar reflector. But as Kevin D. Randle and Donald Schmitt, in UFO Crash at Roswell* say:

"The reporters [who had been summoned to General Ramey's office] never had the opportunity to see the real debris. Marcel said that he had brought it to Ramey's office, where the general examined it and then decided that he wanted to see exactly where the object crashed. Marcel and Ramey left for the map room and while they were gone, someone carried the wreckage out, replacing it with the weather balloon long before any reporters were allowed into the office."

The authors cite Walter G. Haut (personal interview, 1 April, 1989) as the source of this information. Haut was the public information officer at the Roswell Army Air Base who issued the news release mentioning the recovery of a flying disc. 360 [vs. 344] In fact, the foil in the photos is unlike the debris foil as described, the latter being smooth and in small pieces. 361 Therefore, it must be the case that the original wreckage was replaced with the remains of an ordinary radar target. 362 [vs. 344] Therefore the debris had been switched. [ 372]

363 [vs. the logic leading to 319] The skeptic concludes (see 319) that "the balloon that Crary described as having been launched on June 4, 1947 must have carried radar reflectors and must have landed on the Foster ranch, and was the source of the debris in question." But if Marcel Sr. had tried to piece together an ordinary radar target together on his kitchen floor, then he would have been a nut. 364 He wasn't a nut. 365 Therefore, the debris was not ordinary. 366 Therefore, the debris couldn't have been simply the remains of a radar target.

367 [vs. 311] The skeptic says (see 311) that "Mac Brazel himself, in the July 9, 1947 Roswell Daily Record, is quoted as saying that the debris was made up of sticks, foil, and tape with flower patterns on it." But it's important to recall that Mac Brazel made this claim after he had been in military custody--it is reasonable to assume he had been pressured to tell the cover story given him by the Army.

368 [vs. 317] The skeptic says (see 317) that "Cavitt now says he immediately recognized the debris as the remains of a balloon and its train... covering an area 20 feet square." But the Roswell Daily Record says the stuff covered an area 200 yards in diameter. "Capt. McAndrews says it was a huge Mogul train of balloons over 500 feet long with 23 balloons and son buoys and radar reflectors." (Friedman) Something like that could not come down in an area 20 feet square.*

369 [vs. 318] And, the skeptic says (see 318) that his arguments show that "the debris was reconcilable with a Mogul balloon train." But if Maj. Marcel had taken a mere radar target home, and tried to piece it together on his kitchen floor, he would've been a nut. But he wasn't .a nut. In fact, he was promoted from major to lieutenant colonel shortly after the Roswell disk episode. "Then he was assigned to a vital program that collected data in a search for evidence that the Soviet Union had exploded its first nuclear weapon."*  Marcel told his interviewers that he had written the very report that President Truman read on the air declaring Russia had exploded an atomic device. If Mac Brazel had taken pieces of a radar target to neighbors, and wanted them to come look at it, or took such pieces to Roswell to show the authorities, he would've been a dope, and no one alleges that he was a dope.

The skeptic might present a rebuttal:

 

Skeptic. 370 [vs. 322] You argue (see 322) that "in fact, the lack of radar tracking records suggests that none of the launches had radar targets." But C. Moore, the on-scene Project Engineer of Mogul, thought that the June 4th flight may have had radar targets. Moore would've known if they all lacked targets. All that I have to do is demonstrate that its possible that the June 4th flight carried radar targets.

371 [vs. 357] And you note that "Major Marcel described the 'foil' as being thin as tinfoil but could not be bent or dented." But we can't trust Marcel's testimony. After all, in correspondence with Robert Todd and C. E. Moore, Newton claimed to have met Major Marcel in General Ramey's office, and that Marcel had insisted that the balloon and radar targets on the floor were parts of an alien spacecraft and that the markings on the sticks were alien hieroglyphics. [Durant relates this claim by Newton][ 374]

372 [vs. 362] You say (see 362) that "the debris had been switched." But General Thomas DuBose, then colonel and General Ramey's chief of staff took the material from the plane to Ramey's office, and was one of those posing in the photos with the debris. Jaime Shandera interviewed DuBose and DuBose was adamant that there was no switch. [ 375]

373 Also, in an interview in William Moore's book The Roswell Incident, Jesse Marcel Sr. said that the photos that he was in were of the actual debris, and in the later photos, that he was not in, the material was not the actual debris. But the photos with Marcel Sr. clearly show remains of an ML-307 radar reflector.

 

374 [vs. 371] Here, the skeptic points out (see 371) that "Newton claimed to have met Major Marcel in General Ramey's office, and that Marcel had insisted that the balloon and radar targets on the floor were parts of an alien spacecraft and that the markings on the sticks were alien hieroglyphics." But If we were to credit Newton's story, then we'd have to say that Major Marcel was delusional.*   374a But as I noted above (369), he wasn't delusional. As I said, he was promoted from major to lieutenant colonel shortly after the Roswell disk episode, and "then he was assigned to a vital program that collected data in a search for evidence that the Soviet Union had exploded its first nuclear weapon."*  Marcel told his interviewers, "I wrote the very report that President Truman read on the air declaring Russia had exploded an atomic device."

375 [vs. 372] And the skeptic says (see 372) that "General Thomas DuBose...was adamant that there was no switch." But DuBose had said it was a cover story.*

 

There was a cover-up that

was so intense that it

cannot be explained by

the theory that it was a mere balloon.

 

376  On July 8, Mac Brazel was taken by the military from the home of Walt Whitmore, Sr., along with the wire recording of an interview, conducted ? by Jud Roberts, of Brazel. Brazel was detained by the military for four or five days to a week, during which time he was not allowed to use a phone, had to endure an Army physical, was questioned, the same questions being asked over and over, was subjected to intimidation. Also during this period, Brazel's neighbors, Floyd Proctor and L. D. Sparks, saw Brazel in Roswell surrounded by military men. Mac walked right past them as if he didn't know them. Leonard "Pete" porter and Bill Jenkins also saw Brazel with the military escort. Brazel was escorted to The Roswell Daily Record, The Morning Dispatch, and Roswell radio stations KGFL and KSWS, where he gave interviews, now telling a new story. He no longer claimed that there was anything unusual about the debris, but now claimed that the object was just a weather balloon. He now said that he discovered the object on June 14.*

377 On July 9, 1947, the military conducted searches of news offices of media in Roswell, Albuquerque, and Santa Fe in order to get copies of the original press release and other documents relating to the event.*

378 On July 8, the minority owner of KGFL, Jud Roberts, got a call from the executive secretary of the FCC, T. J. Slowie, who threatened KGFL with the loss of its license should they broadcast any part of Brazel's interview.*

379 A few minutes after the call from the FCC was made to KGFL, U.S. Senator Dennis Chavez called KGFL and strongly advised that KGFL do what the FCC told them to do.*

380 Recall that Lydia Sleppy's teletype transmission to the AP of John McBoyle's news story about the crashed disk and the bodies was interrupted by the FBI. Later, when Sleppy brought the subject up to McBoyle, he told her to forget about it. He said that she wasn't supposed to know about it. McBoyle died in 1991 without having talked to either his family or UFO researchers about the incident.*

381 While Mac was in military custody, Paul Brazel, one of Mac's sons, arrived to take care of the ranch. He told his nephew, Joe Brazel, that the military threw him off the ranch--he was not able to water the horses.*

382 Mac's other son, Bill, over time after the incident collected scraps of the debris that the military clean-up crews had missed. He put these pieces into a cigar box. During a visit to Wade's Bar in Corona, he mentioned that he had some scraps of the debris. The next day, an officer named Captain Armstron and Three NCOs visited him and confiscated his collection.*

383 Bill took the men out to the pasture, and while he was gone, six soldiers came in and "trashed" the house, even prying up the floorboards. In the cattle shed they slit open the feedbags, spilling the feed on the ground. Fawn Fritz, Bill's daughter, told researchers that they went so far as to empty a water holding tank.*

384 Bob Wolf, who was minority owner of KGFL, talked to Mac Brazel at a festival in Corona. Wolf brought up the 1947 incident.?Mac said, "Those people will kill you if I tell you what I know!" and walked away.*

385 Recall how George Houck, whom Earl Fulford claims drove the truck carrying the space ship onto the base, refused, so many years after the incident, to talk to Fulford about it.*

386 Frank Joyce, the KGFL broadcaster who had talked on the phone to Mac Brazel when Brazel was in Sheriff Wilcox's office on July 6, was called by "a military person in Washington" who told Joyce to be quiet about the incident. Joyce told him where to go. The caller said, "I'll show you what I can do!" and hung up the phone. One or two days after he received the call, Joyce was told by Walt Whitmore, his boss, to get into Walt's car. Joyce got in the car, and noticed that a strange man dressed in a strange uniform was in the back seat.

Whitmore drove north for over an hour, and pulled up to a shack. Whitmore told Joyce to go into the shack. Joyce went in alone. Shortly thereafter, Mac Brazel came in and said, "You're not going to say anything about what I told you the other day, are you?" Joyce replied that if Brazel did not want him to, then he would not. Brazel left, commenting that their lives would never be the same. When Joyce went back to the car, he saw that the strange man was gone. Soon after that, Joyce was taken to a Texas hospital, where he stayed for a year or so--an episode in his life that he doesn't fully understand.*

387  Frankie Dwyer Rowe, at the time of the incident, was shown a metallic piece of the wreckage by a highway patrol officer. After being wadded up in the hand and dropped, the piece would regain its shape. It also couldn't be cut or burned.

A day or two later, a man in an MP uniform came to the house wanting to talk to Frankie. The man questioned Frankie about what she had seen. He smacked his palm with his billy club and told her she and her whole family would be killed if she said anything to anyone about the incident. He said, "There's a big desert out there. No one will ever find you."*

388  Investigators Carey and Schmitt report that the widows of many witnesses shouted "He never said anything," before slamming down the phone or slamming the door.*

389  Dee Proctor, who as a 7-year-old, was with Mac Brazel when they discovered the debris field in 1947 refused to talk with UFO researchers about the incident. He died in 2006.*

390 Former Roswell deputy sheriff Tommy Thompson, who would be expected to have been fully aware of the events in question, tells researchers that he has no memory of it at all.

391 Trinidad "Trini" Chavez was the young son of a hired hand working on the Richards ranch, which bordered the Foster ranch. Trini watched the clean-up from a distance with friends. He told researchers that he saw soldiers lined up, picking up the debris. He described how trucks and jeeps surrounded the site.*

392 Associated Press photographer, Robin Adair, was sent to Roswell from El Paso, Texas. He said he could not get pictures because the area was ringed by policemen and FBI personnel. He said that the authorities wouldn't let them get within three-quarters of a mile of the site. Adair flew over the site but was waved off. He said that there were many troops and vehicles on the scene.*

393 In 1947, Sgt. Robert E. Smith was assigned to the First Air Transport Unit. He told UFO researchers that several groups, each comprising 60 or more men, were taken to the Foster ranch for the clean-up. They were told to pick up everything not nailed down. He described how one group would cover the site, then another group would go over the same area.*

394 According to Earl Fulford, who had seen the truck carrying the tarp-covered object and spoken to its driver, his friend George Houck [see above], he, along with 15 to 20 other men were bused to a remote site (the Brazel debris field). He said that armed MPs surrounded the area. Fulford and the others were each given a burlap bag and told to put anything they found into the bags. He said that they walked side by side in a single line, picking up the debris. They went back and forth over the field until 4 p.m.*

395 First Lt. Walter Haut, the Public Information Officer for the 509th Bomb Group at the Roswell AAF, the man who had sent out the news release about the recovered disk, stated in the affidavit that, in accord with his wishes, was released after his death [see above], that teams would periodically go out to the sites in order to search for any remaining material.*

396 Recall that Maj. Patrick H. Saunders, who was the Roswell AAF base adjutant in 1947, shortly before he died, bought a number of copies of the paperback edition of The Truth About the UFO Crash at Roswell by Kevin Randle and Don Schmitt. On the flyleaf of this book, Randle and Schmitt describe how the cover-up and cleanings were accomplished. It explains how records were altered and serial numbers were changed. It describes how the cleanup was done by MPs brought in from different locations so that the individuals involved would be less likely to know each other and talk about it together. Saunders wrote the following note above this paragraph in each copy and mailed the books to close friends and family: "Here's the truth and I still haven't told anybody anything!"*

 

397 If the crashed object had been a Mogul balloon and array, constructed of familiar and unclassified materials, any cover-up would have been far less intensive than the cover-up that, as shown by the above material, actually occurred.

398 But the cover-up was intensive to the degree indicated by this material.

399 So the crashed object could not have been a Mogul balloon and array.*

__________________________________________________________________________________

 

Notes

 

274. source: Log Summary of the NYU Group as given in Wikipedia--AF Report on Roswell

277. Moore's book: UFO Crash at Roswell: the Genesis of a Modern Myth, with Saler & Ziegler

291. adapted from an argument by Charles Moore

304. Durant citing C. Moore D1, p. 10

317. Stanton T. Friedman, "Kent Jeffrey and Roswell," 1997

317a. R. J. Durant, "The Roswell Debris Testimony (Part Three)," MUFON UFO Journal, March 1998, p. 8

319. 287, 292, 296, 318 MMP (Multiple Modus Ponens...)

323. a point made by Brad Sparks

327.  argument based on one by David Rudiak

329. R. J. Durant, "The Roswell Debris Testimony of Dr. Jesse Marcel, Jr. (Part 2) ," MUFON UFO Journal, Feb.1998, p. 18

330. ibid.

331. ibid.

332. ibid.

336. F&B, p. 73

336a.  D3 p. 7

339. F&B, p.72

340. D2 p.17

342. ibid.

344. ibid.

345. ibid.

359. Avon Books 1991 pp 75-6

368. from an argument by Stanton Friedman in "Kent Jeffrey and Roswell," July 21, 1997

369. F&B p17

374. Durant III

374a. F&B p17

375. R&S pp. 74-75

376. C&S pp. 39-40, 59, 61, 64-5, 69; R&S p. 41-43; B&M p. 84

377. C&S, 40

378. Jud Roberts. C&S p. 59

379. Frank Joyce. D&S p. 60

380. C&S 60-61, 181

381. Joe Brazel. C&S pp. 70-71

382. Bill Brazel. C&S p. 74

383. Fawn Fritz. C&S p. 74

384. Bob Wolf. C&S, p.76

385. C&S p. 104

386. C&S p. 169

387. Frankie Dwyer Rowe. C&S p.171

388. C&S p. 181

389. C&S pp. 181-2

391. C&S p. 51

392. Robin Adair. C&S p. 63

393. Robert E. Smith. p. 105

394. Earl Fulford. C&S p. 105

395. Walter Haut. C&S p. 217

396. C&S pp. 198, 225-6

399. 397, 398 MT

 

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